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November 6, 2012

New MX13 for Petes


As predicted in my September column in Diesel Progress magazine, the Paccar MX13 that debuted at the IAA in Hanover, Germany, in September has been introduced into Paccar’s Peterbilt models. The announcement on October 30 came a lot sooner than I thought it would however. No doubt we shall see a similar announcement from Kenworth within a few days.

The MX13 features an all-new common-rail injection system, accounting for the model name change from the MX12.9 previously. Gone is the somewhat antiquated unit-pump system, replaced by a full-blown common rail fuel injection system. Running at 2,500 bar (36,000 psi), it is one of the highest rail pressure injection systems so far. Higher pressures provide the finest fuel atomization along with multi-event injections for improved fuel economy and lower noise, both attributes of the current MX12.9. So the new engine is good news for the Paccar brands.

With its new injection system, the MX becomes a thoroughly modern diesel with ratings starting at 380 hp and peak torques up to 1,450 pounds-feet for North America.

The engine debuted in Europe in the heavily remodeled DAF XF105. That truck is mostly new under the skin but the cab structure – the biggest in the industry, says DAF – is unchanged though thoroughly updated. The model change is to bring the tall, cabover XF in line with the upcoming Euro 6 emissions requirements that will hit European customers early 2014. But in line with European practice, the new models are introduced ahead of time so customers can realize the benefits of the required new technology as soon as it is available.

In the case of the XF105 with its new MX13 engine, these benefits include improved fuel economy along with an improved driver experience for recruitment and retention, issues in Europe as much as they are here in the United States.
 
The benefits of early adoption of the new emissions level are societal as well, as the new, cleaner technologies get to the market earlier and in larger numbers than is the case in North America, where the last three technology jumps to meet emissions have seen a pre-buy of older technology and a slower post-buy of cleaner engines.

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